Washington, DC, to lose more than 100 cherry blossom trees, including beloved 'Stumpy'

Washington, D.C., is set to lose over 100 of its iconic cherry trees next year, including one lovingly referred to as “Stumpy.”

The trees will be removed as part of a multiyear restoration of the Tidal Basin, one that has been “long overdue,” the Associated Press noted.

In the summer of 2024, work will begin to replace the Tidal Basin’s seawall, which reportedly has been in need of repairs for years.

CAN YOU REALLY TELL A TREE’S AGE FROM THE RINGS ON ITS STUMP? WHAT YOU NEVER KNEW

The current seawall has deteriorated to the point where the Potomac River floods the area around the cherry trees twice each day at high tide.

The waters flood not only the paths pedestrians use to walk around the Tidal Basin, they also cover the roots of some of the cherry trees.

The renovation project will take about three years and will come at a cost of $113 million, said Mike Litterst, National Park Service spokesman for the National Mall, on Friday to Fox News Digital.

Stumpy — seen at right — is the short, gnarled tree that has amassed a fan base over the last few years. It’s set to be removed as part of a repair project. (AP Photo/Nathan Ellgren)

The rebuilt seawall will have benefits for both visitors and for the trees themselves, said Litterst, as the AP noted.

“It’s certainly going to benefit the visitor experience, and that’s very important to us,” he said.

“But most of all, it’s going to benefit the cherry trees, who right now are every day, twice a day, seeing their roots inundated with the brackish water of the Tidal Basin.”

The repeated floods have killed “entire stretches” of trees that cannot be replaced until the floods are stopped, he said.

CHRISTMAS TREES ARE JUST ONE PART OF THE ALLURE THAT A VERMONT FAMILY BRINGS TO NYC EACH DECEMBER

The renovation plans call for the removal of 300 trees — with nearly half being cherry trees, said the Associated Press.

The trees will be turned into mulch, which will be used to protect the remaining trees.

After the seawall is rebuilt, 277 cherry trees will be planted to replace the ones removed.

Since the announcement that the year 2024 will be Stumpy’s final bloom, visitors have flocked to pay their “respects” to the tree. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

While the repairs are necessary to preserve the life of the remaining cherry trees, the looming loss of “Stumpy” has taken social media by storm.

Stumpy, a tree that is significantly smaller and more gnarled than the other cherry trees in the Tidal Basin, first came to prominence in 2020, said the Associated Press.

Stumpy has inspired legions of fans, as well as T-shirts, a calendar and a mascot costume.

SNAKE IN MARYLAND IS RECOVERING AFTER ACCIDENTALLY SWALLOWING A GEAR SHIFT KNOB: VERY ‘UNUSUAL CASE’

Since the announcement that 2024 would be Stumpy’s final cherry blossom season, people have taken to placing tributes at the base of the tree, and sharing them on social media.

Local sports teams have also paid their respects to Stumpy.

A total of 140 cherry trees will be removed this summer to facilitate much-needed repairs to the seawall around the Tidal Basin. New trees will be planted afterward. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsvais)

On Friday, March 22, the Washington Capitals posted a picture of an employee holding a special “Cherry Blossom Jersey” next to the doomed tree.

“Had to pay our respects to Stumpy,” the team posted on X, formerly known as Twitter.

The Washington Nationals brought Teddy (Roosevelt) and George (Washington), two of its Presidents Race mascots, to say goodbye to Stumpy as well.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

“Just a few ICONS,” the Washington Nationals posted on X on March 22.

“Farewell, Stumpy,” the team added.

While Stumpy’s days on the Tidal Basin are numbered, his genetic legacy will continue on, said the Associated Press.

The National Arboretum is planning on cloning part of Stumpy’s genetic material into new trees — which will “eventually” be planted at the Tidal Basin, they said.

The Associated Press contributed reporting.

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle

Christine Rousselle is a lifestyle reporter with Fox News Digital.

Check Also

Young woman breaks fishing record set in place for nearly half a century

A 21-year-old woman from Georgia recently broke a statewide fishing record, officials say. The Georgia …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *