Ancient shipwrecks, artifacts dating as early as 3000 BC uncovered by underwater researchers

European researchers recently discovered several ancient shipwrecks in Greek waters, some of which date back thousands of years.

The shipwrecks were discovered in the waters surrounding the island of Kasos, the Greek Ministry of Culture, a government department that preserves the country’s cultural heritage and promotes the arts, announced on March 13. The survey was completed in October 2023.

In a press release translated from Greek to English, officials saidthat “a total of ten shipwrecks were discovered, as well as important individual finds.”

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The oldest sunken shipwrecks at the site date back to 3000 B.C., and the latest are from World War II. Shipwrecks from the Classical period (460 B.C.), Hellenistic Greece (100 B.C. to 100 A.D.) and Roman Greece (200 B.C. to 300 A.D.) were also found.

The recent underwater archaeological survey was conducted near Kasos, Greece. (Greece Ministry of Culture and Sports)

Researchers also found wrecks and artifacts from the medieval period and the time of the Ottoman Empire. Researchers dove as deep as 154 feet to examine the wrecks.

“[The study of the artifacts] offers new information and archaeological data [about] aspects of the history of Kasos as well as the rich cultural heritage of the Mediterranean,” the Greek Ministry of Culture said.

“Sunken remains of ancient ships with goods from Spain, Italy, Africa and the coasts of Asia Minor were brought to light by an interdisciplinary team of Greek and foreign researchers and professors.”

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Researchers discovered wrecks and artifacts from the medieval period and the time of the Ottoman Empire, plus classical Greece and ancient Rome. (Greece Ministry of Culture and Sports)

Using tech equipment, researchers snapped over 20,000 underwater photographs, which were used to study the findings.

“[The study] brought to light unique finds, including: a Spanish Dressel 20 amphora with a seal on its handle dated between 150-170 AD,” the press release said. Amphoras were vessels used to carry liquid, such as olive oil.

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Over 20,000 underwater photographs were taken of the ancient shipwrecks. (Greece Ministry of Culture and Sports)

Researchers also found African-made drinking vessels and bottles from the Roman Greece period, along with a stone anchor from the Greek Archaic Period (800 B.C. to 480 B.C.)

“At the same time, the mapping and bathymetry of the Kasos-Karpathos reef and the Karpatholimnion area was carried out for the first time, with the use of a side scanning sonar machine,” the Greek Ministry of Culture’s release said.

“Finally, the remains of a shipwreck from the latest period, possibly from the World War II era, were identified. It is a wooden boat with metal elements, the size of which is estimated at 25 [meters] to 30 [meters].”

Surveyors found multiple artifacts relating to ancient trading networks in the wrecks. (Greece Ministry of Culture and Sports)

Fox News Digital reached out to the Greek Ministry of Culture and the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities for more information.

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle.

Andrea Vacchiano is a breaking news writer for Fox News Digital and Fox Business. You can follow her on X at @andrea_vacch or send story tips to [email protected].

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